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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 126 (some duplicates have been removed)
to be done about it. >> more afghans thought the election was -- had been very corrupt and had been very satisfied with the result. so they can hold both concepts that are the media, which seems able to do. we recently did a study assumes to press against any and embarrass perspective. we looked at 20 post conflict read election conflicts, peacekeeping and peace enforcement efforts, the biggest fear -- the big enforcement efforts. the monthly smaller u. n ones and a dozen or more other places. we evaluated them on and at the of places. also, did they approach of the democratization and freedom house chorus to rank them. did they produce of the government, we used indices and they rick every government in the world. did the economy expanded? did did the citizens improved and the nearly use the human development index which looks of both levels of in, but also education and health and other criteria. in democratization, afghanistan did not pass the test. that is definitely a failure. it was about the metal in terms of how much of it was democratized. but in to a government effectiveness, i
will grow, there will be more elections. there will be more institutional reform. there will be a better government but afghanistan will continue to face problems, there may be violence and there might be other challenges as we move forward but the speed of progress will move and will not stop. will afghanistan remember the united states as a country that helped or a country that did not help? definitely afghanistan will remember the united states as a country that helped. definitely afghanistan will remember that it was the u.s. assistance that brought so much to afghanistan. who will forget the less pleasant aspect ours relationship and we will move forward in the gratitude of the help that the united states has provided to afghanistan and also our other neighbors. but from today as we move forward will this relationship be a emotional as it was at time as you have heard in the past many years? will this relationship billion more mature? this relationship has already grown mature. we recognize the united states interest and afghanistan and the region and the united states recognizes th
than two months left before the election and in many ways this was the time this book was designed for because it's winter these last two months, this is when the election really gets going and to me, one of the great untold stories is not just obama versus romney. it's obama versus karl rove. he is in behind-the-scenes the whole time and he has put together over $1 billion that will be spent in these last two months and we in new york are not going to see much of it. it will be spent in the battleground states. and he has becomes the king of the super pacs. when you put together his money with the money that romney has raised and the republican national committee has a total of about $1.8 billion. to put that in perspective and no eight, mccain had $375 million to spend so this is a factor of five and you will start seeing it coming out now. and the other thing i wanted to discuss about him is who is he really and what does he do? yes a political operative. how does he operate? what does he really do? i talked to a couple of sources about that and one who is one of several who has
and a new election is called. >>> prime minister shinno abe has -- the council on economic and fiscal policy is one of his two key pillars of his economic plan, along with a new task force to revive the economy. he chaired the first session of the council which reopened on wednesday after over three years of suspension. the financial minister, and bank of japan governor and four specialists from the private sector also took part. >> translator: in this panel we will discuss key policy matters to revitalize the japanese economy. i hope the members will draw up an outline of the government's economic and fiscal policies by the middle of this year. >>> as a first step to revitalize japan 'economy, they discussed a stimulus package worth nearly $230 billion. it focuses on public works projects. abe also asked the panel to look for ways of cooperation to pull the country out of deflakes. >>> their agenda includes adjusting tax rates for the wealthy. a tax panel made up of policy chiefs. wants to compile the agenda between the main opposition. officials called for the government to take low-income
this amounts to is an offensive ahead of the talks. he is expected on friday. i asked him. he has had elections that were criticized for being flogged, so one -- being flawed, so why not have free and fair elections to solve the problem. >> it is alive. the elections took place for international observers. >> rebels want him to stand down. they have already accused him of peddling propaganda about the cause. this is not a man -- this is a man who says he wants peace. >> rebels in the democratic republic of condo have declared a unilateral ceasefire. they made the announcement ahead of a second round of peace talks. they pulled out again in december after a nine-month rebellion. rebels said they will honor the cease-fire even if the government will not. india is promising to respond to the killing of two soldiers in the kashmir region. they say they were killed by troops who crossed over into indian territory. francois hollande has denied the accusations. >> according to the indian army, the group of soldiers took good vantage to cross what is called the line of control that separates india and
is stephanie schriock. she is the president of emily's list. guest: this election was a mandate for women's leadership across the country. an historic number of women were sworn in it to congress last week. this election was also about women voters and women's issues, some of which i would prefer not having a debate about. we will see more and more women stepping up to run. host: 20 senators, 81 representatives in 2013. what issues to the brink when it comes to women's issues? guest: we have never had 20 women in the u.s. senate. it is a great benchmark to hit. i would like to see it at 50. we're adding diversity to the debate. we will end up with policies that are best for our committees. these women are bringing different perspectives on all sorts of issues including economics, education, the environment. i think you'll see a lot of different thoughts and ideas on how to get things done and how to find compromise. host: how does a play out with women in leadership roles? guest: we have a new number of women serving on committees and shares. barbara mikulski is the first women's chair of
election. but most of them, honestly, were from the republican primaries. come on. very few of the laugh out loud moments from the last election involved president obama himself telling a laugh out loud deadpan joke. but it did happen once. >> i think governor romney maybe hasn't spent enough time looking at how our military works. you mentioned the navy, for example, and that we have fewer ships than we did in 1916. well, governor, we also have fewer horses and bayonets because the nature of our military's changed. we have these things called aircraft carriers where planes land on them. we have ships that go underwater. nuclear submarines. >> ships that go underwater. after that moment in the third presidential debate last year there was a brief but fascinating flurry of really earnest fact checking about the question of whether or not there really are fewer bayonets in the u.s. military right now. remember? tmz had an exclusive inside scoop on outrage from the bayonet community. "we are not obsolete." in fact, the last famous bayonet charge in american history was in 1951 during the ko
? and are you completely committed to stepping down as president of the elections next year? >> i want us to remember why we went to afghanistan. we went into afghanistan because 3,000 americans were viciously murdered. by a terrorist organization that was operating openly and at the invitation of those who were then ruling afghanistan. it was absolutely the right thing to do for us to go after that organization. to go after the host government that had aided and abetted or at least allowed for these attacks to take place. and because of the heroic work of our men and women in uniform, and because of the cooperation and sacrifices of afghans who had also been brutalized by that then-host government, we achieved our central goal. which is or have come very close to achieving our central goal, which is to decompass tate al qaeda. to dismantle them. to make sure that they can't attack us again. and everything that we've done over the last ten years, from the prospective of the u.s. national security interests, have been focused on that aim. and at the end of this conflict, we are going to be
their demand for fresh elections and called off a rival demonstration of their own. for now, there is no power vacuum. despite his absence. >> for more on his health, i am joined by the one who formerly served as the director of the central bank. he is so reviled here in washington and you see those people turning out for an inauguration where he is not present and this is not in north korea situation where there are forced in, they really love him. >> his talent is the ability to connect with the people and that he is taking care of their interests. and without him, they would be bereft of any protection. >> what kind of country are we going to find? >> a deeply divided country. it is divided, as you saw, from those that don't like him and those that adore him. that is not a social divide. in which the middle class doesn't like him and the poor does. 45% voted against him. the country doesn't have a middle class. in order to get 45% of the vote, that means the millions of poor people voted against him, but people also voted for him. they have a very strong an almost spiritual connection with
. >> this is one that has taken a back burner. we are not that far removed from the election. the election was about by and large nothing more than the economy and which side could do it better. as a result almost every other issue gets pushed to the side, but we have, you know -- there are realtime tables in place in afghanistan about what we have pledged to do, what we will do. you talk about chuck hagel. what chuck hagel's role in all of that, if et wants to be secretary of defense. it's a complicated issue, and it's more complicated politically, andrea, simply because the american public -- this happened in iraq. it's clearly happening in afghanistan. the american public has tired of our involvement in these conflicts. this is not something new. this is something that has been long and coming. if you look at the history in polling at least of when that happens, public opinion almost never sort of sways back up to all of a sudden be supportive and think this was a battle worth fighting and those sorts of things. it's dangerous ground for any politician because of that. >> we are seeing
of the seven u.s. presidents re-elected since world war ii have been less popular in the second terms. so can the president use early momentum to push the policy agenda? let's spin. guys, i have been saying for a while now i think that his second term he's going the see a lot more pushback from the friends on the left than his foes on the right. for one, he's been re-elected. i think the gop has generally resigned themselves to the fact that they're going to be four more years to obama and they have a little less incentive to hang him for every misstep he has but democrats are incentives to watch him more carefully. one, payment, you know, a number of groups, unions for one, invested heavily in barack obama's re-election and i'm sure they want some roi now. two, accountability on the promises the president made in the first term, promises on gay marriage, promises on immigration, maybe promises on guns now. and third, this idea of a liberal legacy. think i that a number of folks on the left were willing to forego or ignore some of the issues in his first term that now they're looking at. the
it was unaware of the pastor's prior stance at the time he was elected. a new study has found up to half of all food worldwide is going to waste. britain's institution of mechanical engineers sayat least 1.2 billion of the 4 billion tons of food produced each year is thrown out due to problems with harvesting, transporting and storage, as well as wasteful behavior from sellers and consumers. the report calls food wastage -- the findings come as nations across the globe continue to grapple with soaring food prices. brendan cox of the group save the children said the soaring food costs threaten to cause more unnecessary deaths. >> there is a new normal of the food crisis. and the last year we have seen wheat increased by 25%. already around 3 million children die every year as a result of malnutrition. what could happen next year could make the situation much worse. >> fears of a spike in food prices have run after a long standing drought prompted the obama administration to declare a natural disaster in large parts of the midwest. conditions in the courtroom and we producing states -- kansas, co
. >> woodruff: karzai has been dogged by charges of fraud since his re-election, part of larger concerns about corruption in his government. he acknowledged the concerns today, and said he hopes for a proper election to name his successor. >> brown: we pick up on today's meeting with two men with extensive experience in managing u.s.-afghan relations. said jawad was afghanistan's ambassador to washington from 2003 to 2010. before that, he was president karzai's chief of staff. and peter tomsen was a career diplomat who served as special envoy on afghanistan during the george h.w. bush administration. he's the author of "the wars of afghanistan." peter tomsen, let's start with you. what jumps out at you. help us decode what was in that meeting, what was most pournt. >> is think what jumped out at me mostly was the acceleration in the transition. which i think is good. that american troops are going to be leaving at a faster clip. and also on the function side, so to speak that the role of american troops in combat as was mentioned in the clip is going to be phased out. also, what president karz
and the bank of japan. >> translator: during the cent allower house election campaign i call eed for the central banko set a 2% inflation target and take bold, monetary easing steps. i want the bank to take this into consideration when it forms monetary policy. >> translator: the government and the central bank have had monetary discussions three times a month. we will continue to exchange with the government. >> they hope to get certain guarantees from the government. these include not having to state when the inflation target will be achieved and the flexibility to change policy if prices rise with no economic recovery. it's not only the bank of japan that will play a role to get out of inflation, the abe will also have a part. support on cutting edge medicine and school efforts to reduce bullying will be included. more than $2 billion will be allocated to promote advanced technologies be they will air mark $227 million to support research on regenerative medicine. the plan calls for an extra $11 million to double the time counselors work at elementary and junior high schools a
that much of this is de influence of foreigners? will you stand down for elections next year? >> i want us to remember why we went to afghanistan. we went into afghanistan because thousand americans were viciously murdered by a terrorist organization that was operating openly and at the invitation of those who were then ruling afghanistan. it was absolutely the right thing for us to go after that organization, to go after the host government that had aided and abetted or at least allowed for these attacks to take place, and because of the core with worked of our men and women in uniform and because of the corporation and the sacrifices of afghans who had also been brutalized by the then host government, we achieved our central goal, which is -- or have come very close to achieving the central goal -- which is to decapaticate al qaeda. everything we have done over the last 10 years, from the perspective of the u.s. national security interests have been focused on that came. and at the end of this conflict, we are going to be able to say that the sacrifices that were made by those men and wo
and the prosperities that we have gained. in the past many years. we also discussed the issue of election in afghanistan and the importance of elections for the afghan people with the hope that we'll be conducting a free and fair election in afghanistan where our friends in the international community and particularly the united states will be assisting in conducting those elections. of course. where afghanistan will have the right environment for conducting elections without interference and without undue concerns in that regard for the afghan people. we also discussed in a bit of detail and in the environment that we have all aspects of the bilateral security agreement between afghanistan and the united states, and i informed the president that the afghan people already in the -- called for the strategic partnership agreement between us and the united states have given their approval to this relationship and they value it as one that is good for afghanistan. so in that context the bilateral security agreement is one that the afghan people approve and i'm sure we will conduct it in detai
, such that they have to, you know, that's what they need to do to win their go into general election they will he' lose to more moderate sounding democrats on this issue, and that democrats retake control of the house? >> well, i'd like to see harry reid with so many of his members from red states vulnerable in the coming election, and like to see the response he gets if he proposes to bring forward any serious gun restriction. i don't think it's coming out of the senate. i think too many in the senate majority leader's caucus would say no thank you, no thank you, mr. reid, the chances of a vote coming in the house-- >> see you soon. fly-over country or the heartland. in colorado, a state that's seen its fair share of tragic shootings, the state's legislature is considering several bills to regulate guns. as lawmakers worked earlier this week, 150 worried guns rights activists quietly marched outside to protest the still unwritten been control measures. here is more from the new democratic speaker of the house and some in the crowd. >> a lot of these things can be preempted or eliminated altogether if
? >> this is a worrying sign for the stability of pakistan as it enters a very sensitive period. elections are due to take place within the next three or four months and there are many pakistanis who worry that if the security situation continues to spiral out of control such as it appeared to be doing today that this could create the circumstances where the political process could be in danger even of being derailed. >> suarez: declan walsh reporting from islamabad, thanks for joining us. >> my pleasure. >> brown: next, new mortgage rules from the government, designed to clamp down on risky lending practices. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: at the root of the 2008 credit and housing bust were risky, even reckless mortgages made to customers who couldn't afford them. today the new consumer financial protection bureau issued regulations spelling out how lenders must ensure borrowers can repay their loans. banks that follow the criteria would be protected from most lawsuits. to meet the standard of a qualified mortgage, a bank would have to verify the borrower's income, employment and total debt,
and are you completely committed to stepping down as president after the elections next year? >> i want us to remember why we went to afghanistan. we went in to afghanistan because 3,000 americans were viciously murdered by a terrorist organization that was operating openly and at the invitation of those who were then ruling afghanistan. it was absolutely the right thing to do for us to go after that organization, to go after the host government that had aided and abetted or at least allowed for these attacks to take place. and because of the heroic work of our men and women in uniform, and because of the cooperation and sacrifices of afghans who had also been brutalized by that then host government, we achieved our central goal, which is or have come very close to achieving our central goal which is to deca pass tate al qaeda and dismantle them. everything that we have done over the last ten years, from the perspective of the u.s. national security interests have been focused on that aim. and, you know, at the end of this conflict, we are going to be able to say that the sacrifices that w
to imagine they're now going to come back and actually do something. >> if only there were a senator elected to washington -- >> who cared about the consumer. >> -- that steve rattner supported. >> i think i know where we're going. >> if only there were that person. you could just check them off. >> you know what? there is. >> steve didn't support him. >> absolutely. you are going to come around on elizabeth warren. you just are. who doesn't? elizabeth warren said this on the issue. aig's reckless bets nearly crashed our entire economy. taxpayers across this country saved aig from ruin. and it would be outrageous for this company to turn around and sue the federal government because they think the deal wasn't generous enough. steve. >> so i agree with elizabeth warren who's completely right. >> that's all i need to hear. you just made my morning. >> january 9th of the new session. >> check right there. >> it's amazing what a victory does. >> come on. >> something about 1,000 fathers and orphans. >> something like that. something like that. so i'm curious, mika. i'm reading "the new york time
, it is an aggressive agenda. it is a lot of work. but they elect us to lead, my friends. we will. they elect us to perform and we will. we have proven that we can lead. we have proven that we can perform. we know that with these challenges at hand that is exactly what we must now do. we have daunting challenges. no doubt. but these challenges also pose exciting opportunities. yes, it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems, i know the issues. but, can you imagine how smart this state would be when we actually educate all our children to the best of the god given potential. when every black child and every white child and every urban child is educated to their full potential. i know helping the economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at full speed and all of our cities are at full gain. i know women is have been treated unfairly for a long time. i know it is cultural. i know it is historic. i know it is difficult. can you imagine what this soc
and despite the election results, the position that has been taken on the part of house republicans is that we have to do it our way. if we don't, we simply will not pay america's bills. that cannot be a position that is sustainable over time. it's not one that is good for the economy now and it will not be the precedent i want to establish not just for my presidency but for the future. even if it was on the other side. democrats do not like voting for the debt ceiling yet you never saw a situation in which democrats suggested that we would go ahead and all that we did not get our way 100%. that's not how it works. >> on the issue of guns, given how typical it will be, impossible, to get any gun- control measure passed through this congress, what are you willing or able to do using the powers of your presidency to act without congress? i would also like to know what you make of these long lines we're seeing at gun shows and gun stores all around the country? even in connecticut, applications are up since the shooting. >> my understanding of the vice- president will provide a range of steps we
gratitude. let's give him another round of applause. [applause] to the elected and legislative leaders who have been introduced once before, it's a pleasure to be with you. attorney general, thank you for being here. co-leaders senators, pleasure to be with you, assembly speaker, snot minority leader -- senate minority leader. assembly minority leader, i want to thank them for their leadership because last year and the year before were extraordinary years for this state. and the legislative accomplishments really turned this state around and they were difficult and challenging because it went to the real heart of the issues. but they did it. at this time i would ask the assembly and senate to stand so you can be recognized for your great work. stand please. [applause] members of the court, welcome to all of you, we thank you. [applause] >> as you heard earlier and i hope as you can tell the capitol looks a little bit different than it did over the past few years. the renovation has been complete. the renovation was accelerated and extended. it's complete. the building has been refurbished,
after the elections next year? >> i want us to remember why we went to afghanistan. we went into afghanistan because 3,000 americans were viciously murdered by a terrorist organization that was operating openly and at the invitation of those who were then ruling afghanistan. it was absolutely the right thing to do for us to go after that organization, to go after the host government that had aided and abetted or at least allowed for these attacks to take place. and because of the heroic work of our men and women in uniform, and because of the cooperation and sacrifices of afghans who had also been brutalized by that then host government. we achieved our central goal, which is -- or have come very close to achieving our stroll go central goal, which is to decapacitate al qaeda. to dismantle them. to make sure they can't attack us again. and everything that we have done over the last ten years, from the perspective of the u.s. national security interests, have been focused on that aim. and, you know, at the end of this conflict, we are going to be able to say that the sacrific
in a vacuum. as washington's elected officials and opinion leaders search for common ground on fax policy, fiscal policy, and regulatory regimes, we need to focus on solutions that will support our ability to provide for secure american energy future. there is room for agreement. we welcome president obama's campaign promises to support oil and natural gas development as part of a truly all of the above energy strategy. we can offer solutions to some of the most pressing issues that will impact our economic future tax reform, infrastructure improvement leasing and permitting on federal land, and regulations that don't add unnecessary layers of compliance burden on top of the existing. and ensuring regulations will comprise our ability to grow the economy and create jobs to domestic energy. and there's plenty of work to be done as we all know. our economy has struggled to recover. millions of americans are still out of work, and millions have stopped looking for work all together. agree geopolitical tear -- many americans wonder if washington can work in a bipartisan manner to solve the mo
rockefeller announced he will not seek reelection when his term ends in 2014. he is first elected to the senate in 1984. he served as the governor of west virginia from 1977 until 1985. this is about 20 minutes. >> thank you, sharon. so incredibly much. a perfect life, by far the most popular rockefeller and west virginia. -- wife, by far, the most popular rockefeller in west virginia. i will get right to them. i have decided not to run again at the conclusion of this term. not now, but in 2014. i hope each of you can understand that this is an entirely personal decision. it is not a political decision and it is not easy. it is simply this. as i approached 50 years of nonstop public service, precluding time with the children and sharon. i consider the ways for travel in life. there are many other ways, and i know deep within me that in 2014, it is the right time for me to recalibrate and find a new balance. i came as an untrained social worker back in 1964. i actually begun my public service for years before that, working for the peace corps and the department of state. frankly, i
in germany. though the current government is thinking of creating one ahead of next year's elections. around 7 million people in germany are working at so-called mini jobs, kerning $530 a month, a relatively paltry amount, less than one-fifth the national average what is worse, the wage gap is widening. a trendy opposition and media accused the government of trying to hide in a recent report on income. >> we have a well-to develop low income sector where people are working in tempore situations. it means they cannot get out of the situation by working -- working in poor situations. >> of the increase in the number of working poor came about after the very reforms that may germany so competitive in europe. a competitive edge paid for in many ways by those who can least afford it. al jazeera cumberland. >> india has made an official protest to neighboring pakistan after two soldiers were killed in kashmir. india's summer and -- summoned but pakistani high commissioner to explain. the army said pakistani troops killed the men after crossing a line of control tuesday. in pakistan they say the ac
with the congress about who deleted references to al-qaeda three weeks before the election. i think it was purposefully done and i want to know who did it before we move forward. >> you're committed to holding the nomination up? >> yeah. i don't want to. but i'm not going to let the administration get away from having to be held accountable. the state department, you will hear from hillary clinton. who did change the talking points and take al-qaeda out? what did the president do in seven hours? they are making two movies about the strong leadership and the bin laden raid. this administration leaked every detail about the bin laden raid so the world would know how strong their own national security. when you have a major debacle like benghazi you can't get basic information four months later. i don't think they are pursuing offenders aggressively, frankly. they are stonewalling the congress. john brennanbe nor anyone else should be concerned as the acting director of the c.i.a. until the c.i.a. accounts for their role in changing the talking points. >> bret: director was asked about
. and we just had an election. and elections have consequences, alex. and i think the congressman is absolutely right that we are now drifting toward a parliamentary system. but we don't have a parliamentary system. we have a different system. and in our system the results of the election are meaningful. and the results of this election should suggest to democrats and republicans that the president, unless there is some egregious problem, deserves to have his own choices in government. >> alex, let me just say, the senate has the responsibility to advise and consent. and given the filibuster rules you have to find five republicans, and he'll find out quickly who his friends are. people forget that this election, the republicans held the house. although institutionally they have a majority there, given voting rights and the way the districts are created, the president's got to come to grips with that and somehow both sides are going to find their way out of this. it's going to be just two years of being in the ring, exchanging punches. >> but ultimately, jonathan, your take on chuc
the opposition seems weekend. they dropped their demand for fresh elections and called off a rival demonstration of their own. for now, there is no power vacuum. despite his absence. >> for more on his health, i am joined by the one who formerly served as the director of the central bank. he is so reviled here in washington and you see those people turning out for an inauguration where he is not present and this is not in north korea situation where there are forced in, they really love him. >> his talent is the ability to connect with the people and that he is taking care of their interests. and without him, they would be bereft of any protection. >> what kind of country are we going to find? >> a deeply divided country. it is divided as you saw, from those that don't like him and those that adore him. that is not a social divide. in which the middle class doesn't like him and the poor does. 45% voted against him. the country doesn't have a middle class. in order to get 45% of the vote, that means the millions of poor people voted against him but people also voted for him. they have a very stro
fundamental reforms are possible but the president made this a defining issue in the election. to passe was going preserver medicare -- it was unrealistic to expect this would be front and center during the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> the president says he does not favor changing medicare but on the other hand, he says he favors increasing use of managed care. does that go to the same place from a different direction? >> as you know, i have a certain track record with premium support which is actually a label that can of an article that henry aaron and i wrote in 1995. it was a very different approach, not moderately different, from what congressman ryan has pursued. i have a lot of sympathy for moving in that direction. in a sensible kind of way and we already have the medicare advantage component of medicare. we are about -- about 1/4 of beneficiaries to to get their benefits through a plan offered by some private entity that agrees to take a risk-adjusted payment to cover medicare desk type benefits for people who enroll in its. . motta fighting that program gradually over a decade
that is a very important question. or take, for example, something we talked about a lot during the election. that is private equity managers and many hedge funds managers who can treat their income as capital gains, and even the new deal -- >> bob, here is the problem with what you're saying -- >> steve, you'll agree with me on this, i'm sure. >> here is the problem, we agree we should get rid of all of these loopholes. this is interesting, erin, that when mitt romney talked about this in the campaign of putting a cap on these deductions, it was the democrats, people like robert reich, maybe not you personally, but people of your philosophy who said we can't do that. here's the point -- >> we actually do believe -- >> what? >> i don't know why democrats aren't in favor of putting a cap on those deductions. i'm saying if we're going to get something done on this, erin, what is going to have to happen is democrats are going to have to agree to reduce the tax rates in exchange for getting rid of the loopholes. >> or we're going to have to raise taxes on everyone, as npr ran the numbers. if you
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 126 (some duplicates have been removed)